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January 15, 2019

University of Detroit Mercy will celebrate Black History Month throughout February with a variety of events and engagements that are free open to everyone.

Book talk – Nikki Taylor on Driven Toward Madness

Tuesday, Feb. 5, 6:45 p.m., Student Union Ballroom

Nikki Taylor, chair and professor of history at Howard University, will discuss her new book about runaway slave Margaret Garner, who slits her daughter's throat, rather than see her returned to bondage. Taylor draws upon feminist theory and trauma studies to assess Garner's motives. This story inspired the novel and film Beloved. This event is co-sponsored by African-American Studies (through the Thomas and Karen Waters Fund), the Black Abolitionist Archive and Women's and Gender Studies. A book signing will follow the talk.

Detroit Mercy Theatre Company presents “A Thousand Miles to Freedom”

Thursday, Feb. 14, 7 p.m., Student Union Ballroom

The Theatre Company will premiere a new play, “A Thousand Miles to Freedom,” by Professor of Performing Arts Arthur Beer. The play presents the escape of William and Ellen Craft, who ran away from slavery in 1848 by hiding in plain sight. This event is co-sponsored by the Theatre Company and Alumni Relations.

Book talk – Crystal Fleming on How to Be Less Stupid about Race

Monday, Feb. 18, 6:45 p.m., Student Union Ballroom

Crystal Fleming, associate professor of sociology and Africana studies at SUNY-Stony Brook, will discuss her new book, which blends memoir, satire and critical race theory "to debunk common misconceptions about racism." Fleming is a leading public intellectual on race matters in the United States. This event is co-sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts & Education, African American Studies (through the Thomas and Karen Waters Fund), the Black Abolitionist Archive, Academic Affairs, the Honors Program and the English Department. A book signing will follow the talk.

Documentary and discussion – “Racial Violence in America”

Tuesday, Feb. 19, 4 p.m. Room 114, Chemistry Building

America has a long history of racial violence. This event will include a showing of “An Outrage,” an award-winning documentary on racial lynching, followed by a conversation with Wayne State University Associate Professor of History Kidada Williams. Williams is a nationally-recognized authority on the history of racial violence in America. This event is co-sponsored by the Black Abolitionist Archive and the Honors Program.

Discussion – Benjamin Saulsberry on Racial Reconciliation

Monday, Feb. 25, 1 p.m., Room 124, College of Health Professions Facility

Benjamin Saulsberry of the Emmett Till Interpretive Center in Sumner, Miss., will discuss what his community is doing to promote racial reconciliation at the site of one of the most tragic racial killings in American history. The Till tragedy in 1955 helped spark the Civil Rights Movement. What the city of Sumner is doing may provide a model for racial reconciliation in other communities. This event is sponsored by African-American Studies (through the Thomas and Karen Waters Fund). 

Book talk – Alex Zamalin on Anti-Racism: An Introduction

Thursday, Feb. 28, 12:45 p.m., Room 124, College of Health Professions Facility

Assistant Professor of Political Science and Director of African American Studies Alex Zamalin will discuss his forthcoming book, which explores opposition to racism in the United States from the abolitionists to the Civil Rights Movement to Black Lives Matter. This event is sponsored by African-American Studies (through the Thomas and Karen Waters Fund).

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